Commentary and links relating to media coverage of war; both before, during, and after.


William A. Dorman is Professor of Government at California State University, Sacramento, and has taught a course in War, Peace and the Mass Media since 1970.

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War, Peace, and the Mass Media
 
Tuesday, June 03, 2003  
Standard Operating Procedure
By PAUL KRUGMAN
June 3, 2003

The mystery of Iraq's missing weapons of mass destruction has become a lot less mysterious. Recent reports in major British newspapers and three major American news magazines, based on leaks from angry intelligence officials, back up the sources who told my colleague Nicholas Kristof that the Bush administration "grossly manipulated intelligence" about W.M.D.'s.

And anyone who talks about an "intelligence failure" is missing the point. The problem lay not with intelligence professionals, but with the Bush and Blair administrations. They wanted a war, so they demanded reports supporting their case, while dismissing contrary evidence.

In Britain, the news media have not been shy about drawing the obvious implications, and the outrage has not been limited to war opponents. The Times of London was ardently pro-war; nonetheless, it ran an analysis under the headline "Lie Another Day." The paper drew parallels between the selling of the war and other misleading claims: "The government is seen as having `spun' the threat from Saddam's weapons just as it spins everything else." For the rest of Krugman's argument that the time has come for the press to take the gloves off, see New York Times

4:58 PM

Sunday, June 01, 2003  
Iraqis Dispute Rescue Story
Doctors: Force not needed


By Scheherezade Faramarzi
The Associated Press
May 29, 2003

Nasiriyah, Iraq -- The U.S. commandos refused a key and instead broke down doors and went in with guns drawn. They carried away the prisoner in the dead of night with helicopter and armored vehicle backup -- even though there was no Iraqi military presence, and the hospital staff didn't resist. For the rest of the Associated Press' look into the Lynch rescue, see Newsday

9:07 AM

 
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